Study English in the USA

Study English in the USA

Studying English in the U.S. has been a dream to many. Thousands of students have been applying annually to be admitted to colleges and universities. While most students want to study English in the USA, others want to experience the remarkable American life. As a student wherein English is not your native language, it is never easy to improve your English communication skills without a skilled English teacher with an effective program. As you read this article, you may not be certain as to how you can improve your English efficiently. It is a fact that many students became successful in improving their English communication skills after studying abroad so this article will guide you in deciding to start planning your study in the U.S. in the next coming years and be one of those successful students.

The first step is to think of the requirements when applying for a student visa. This means that you need to check the Bureau of Consular Affairs website or contact them directly. With this, the most critical requirement for studying in the U.S. is acing your student visa interview as the interview is in English. Moreover, an excellent TOEFL or IELTS score also matters as this will give you more opportunity to choose different universities. You should remember that each college or university has different requirements for English proficiency. With this, you should be able to improve your English more extensively.

A good English communication skill is a stepping stone for you to be accepted to a good university in the U.S. You will be in a constant class discussion where explaining and debating is just a routine. Class participation is one of the key performance factors in evaluating your grades. While others may opt to select an easy program, it is always suggested that you choose the intensive program. You will have more benefits in the future, especially when advancing your career in the workplace.

Different Types of English Language Programs in Colleges and Universities

Study English in California

Intensive English Program

This is a challenging program that is usually taken at the beginning of the semester. It is useful for professionals and students preparing for university or business programs. This program emphasizes fluency and accuracy. Students from various countries have attended this program, and it is based on the integrated-skills approach in listening, speaking, reading, writing. A student must have 18 hours a week intensive English program completed to qualify for a student visa.

Highlights

  • Live on campus
  • Full access to the college or university library and other facilities
  • Practice with other students
  • Take some university courses when you have an advanced level of English
  • Work up to 20 hours weekly if you hold an F-1 visa

The Intensive English program is not always a part of a college or university degree program. With this, it is essential that you understand the reality that you cannot guarantee to receive academic credit. When you are admitted to an ESL School, this doesn’t mean that you can be automatically accepted as a student in a college or university. If you plan to study in a university course, make sure that you do your research first. Colleges and universities have different admission requirements and policies. Moreover, it is crucial to keep in mind the cost of a community college, public colleges, and universities because they have lower tuition fees than private ones.

Proprietary English Language Program

While students usually initiate the interest to study English in the USA, there are private ESL schools that cater assistance to students who plan to enter the nearest college or university. The students are already residing near the ESL school and can feel the convenience in completing the program. As a result, this can be very rewarding. The school can prepare students to college and universities’ admission successfully. On the other hand, it is important to note that there are only a few ESL schools that offer housing or arrange home-stays.

Highlights

  • If you are an advanced-level student, you may take one or two courses in the nearest colleges or universities.
  • You can take a few vacation ESL classes in which you learn English while you travel to scenic spots places.
  • You can study flexibly in a familial environment with a state of the art facilities.
Study English in Los Angeles

Finding The Best Program

While the plan to study English in the USA is one of the best decisions you can make, you must do serious research before choosing an ESL school. Read about the courses and programs they offer, their accreditation, and location. You contact the ESL school directly to ask some questions related to your study. Moreover, requesting assistance to your local class adviser can also give you a guarantee that you are identifying the school that is best for you. This process of selecting the school is rewarding as you will know more about the school that will be part of your life. Hence, make sure to choose carefully.

When choosing a program, make sure to consider below areas as they have a significant impact on your success in your plan to study English in the USA.

  • The kind of program you want to attend
  • The cost of the program and other expenses
  • The location you want to go
  • The school’s class size and extracurricular activities
  • The school’s setting, teachers, accommodations and services
  • The school’s accreditation and it’s policy on enrolling in a nearby university

The above list is mostly reflected in a school’s catalog but you must still verify each area to guarantee their authenticity. Hence, doing proper research, asking academic experts in this area, and practicing your English communication skills are equally important in making yourself ready to study English in the USA.

Are you still undecided on which English program you want to enroll? Please contact us below and feel free to fill out the form with any questions you may have about your future English study in the USA.

New Year’s Idioms

In the United States, when the new year is approaching, many people think about what they accomplished and what mistakes or wrong choices they made so they can change them in the year that’s about to start. In other words, they think of the new year as a new beginning – an opportunity to leave anything they don’t like about their life in the past and set goals to change them, or they just set new goals for self-improvement. Here are some idioms or phrases connected with this practice.

New Year’s Resolution– a promise that you make to yourself to start doing something good or stop doing something bad on the first day of the year.

Example: “Did you make any New Year’s resolutions?”

     “Yes, I’m going to eat healthier and give up smoking.”

 

turn over a new leaf– to change your behavior in a positive way.

Example: She turned over a new leaf; she began getting to school on time and doing all her homework.

 

kick the habit– to give up something that you have done for a long time.

Example: He used to smoke but he kicked the habit last year.

 

bite off more than you can chew– when you do something that proves to be too difficult 

Example: I think he’s bitten off more than he can chew taking all those classes; he should’ve started with just a couple of classes at first.

 

get the ball rolling– to make something happen or the beginning of something 

Example: We want to get fit this year so we joined the gym to get the ball rolling.

 

back to the drawing board– to go back to the beginning of a plan, and start over

Example: My plan to read one book per week did not work last year. I have to go back to the drawing board and think of a new way to accomplish my goal of reading more. 

Idioms – leisure

American English Idioms

An idiom is a phrase (group of words) that usually has a figurative meaning. The use of idioms is wide spread in the English language; native English speakers use idioms almost every day.  Therefore, studying idioms is critical for effective communication, whether in listening, speaking, reading, or writing.  Studying idioms not only improves your understanding of the English language but also gives you a deeper insight into American culture.  The idiomatic expressions (idioms) introduced are based on a theme chosen.

 

Idioms Related to Leisure

at (one’s) leisure – at one’s convenience or to do something at one’s pace (without haste)

Example:

If you’re done with your homework, you can spend the rest of the day at (your) leisure.

I plan to complete all my work today so that I can relax tomorrow. I would like to spend at least once a week at (my) leisure.

 

have a blast – have a great time

Blast means an explosion. It seems that the word in this contest is to express intensity of excitement or enjoyment.

Example:

The Thanksgiving potluck by school was great. We had a blast.

Let’s have a blast tonight. Everyone at the party is very friendly and cool.

 

take it easy – 1) to be calm or relaxed 2) take care, be careful

Example:

1) I am going to take it easy this weekend. I’ve been studying too hard for the finals.

2) Take it easy! Let’s keep in touch.

 

in one’s element – to do or be in state of something comfortable

out of one’s element – to do or be in state of something uncomfortable

Example:

Jane is in her element when she’s drawing. She loves to draw and sits still for hours drawing. However, Jane is out of her element when she’s doing her math homework. She cannot sit still beyond 10 minutes.

 

barrel of laughs – very funny or having great fun
‘Barrel’ is a big container. The ‘barrel’ in this context means ‘lot of’ laughter or fun. *The expression is often used in a sarcastic context.

Example:

For Jason, the English literature course isn’t a barrel of laughs.  To a non-native English speaker, it is a very challenging course.

*Heidi is always nagging, if not very demanding. She’s a barrel of laughs.

 

Do you have similar idioms in your own country related to the English idioms here?

Do you have good sample sentences for the idioms introduced here?

Please share to reinforce the idioms you’ve studied here. Study English by learning idioms regularly.

Idioms – Knowledge

American English Idioms

An idiom is a phrase (group of words) that usually has a figurative meaning. The use of idioms is wide spread in the English language; native English speakers use idioms almost every day.  Therefore, studying idioms is critical for effective communication, whether in listening, speaking, reading, or writing.  Studying idioms not only improves your understanding of the English language but also gives you a deeper insight into American culture.  The idiomatic expressions (idioms) introduced are based on a theme chosen.

 

Idioms related to Knowledge

know for a fact – to know with a certainty

You often use the expression to emphasize your statement or point.

Example:

I know for a fact that Jane does not like Paul. Jane told me who she likes.

 

know (something) by heart – to have memorized something completely.

If you know something by heart, that means you have memorized it.

Example:

Mary does not need the lyrics for the song. She knows it by heart because she has heard it so many times.

Peter knows all the states in America by heart.

 

Know (something) backwards and forwards – to be very familiar with or knowledgeable of a subject

If you know something backwards and forwards, you really know about the subject well.

Example:

Jane knows about the operations of her company backwards and forwards.  She has worked there for many years.

 

learn the ropes/know the ropes –  learn or understand the basic skills to perform a task

The ropes here probably came from the complicated roping required for sailing ships. If you know the ropes of a task, you know the basic skills required to accomplish the task.

Example:

First learn the ropes by watching Jim who has many years of experience.  Then you will know the ropes.

 

Under one’s belt – 1) consumed (food or drink) 2) acquired (knowledge or experience)

Whatever you consume (eat) will be in your tummy (stomach); the food you eat eventually goes below your belt-line. The expression is often used for knowledge or experience you have acquired. It makes sense in that whatever you have eaten, it’s safely yours.

Example:

Please buy Paul something to eat so that he has some food under his belt. He’s very annoying when he’s hungry.

Once he figured out a few techniques under his belt, he out performed all his friends.

 

Do you have similar idioms in your own country related to the English idioms here?

Do you have good sample sentences for the idioms introduced here?

Please share to reinforce the idioms you’ve studied here. Study English by learning idioms regularly.